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Hot Topics: Computer Models Could Predict Suicide Risk

Jackie Werner Hot Topics in Research, Psychology and Psychiatry

Validation of an Electronic Health Record–Based Suicide Risk Prediction Modeling Approach Across Multiple Health Care Systems

Barak-Corren Y, Castro VM, Nock MK, et al. Validation of an electronic health Record–Based suicide risk prediction modeling approach across multiple health care systems. JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3(3):e201262. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.1262.

Importance  Suicide is a leading cause of mortality, with suicide-related deaths increasing in recent years. Automated methods for individualized risk prediction have great potential to address this growing public health threat. To facilitate their adoption, they must first be validated across diverse health care settings.

Objective  To evaluate the generalizability and cross-site performance of a risk prediction method using readily available structured data from electronic health records in predicting incident suicide attempts across multiple, independent, US health care systems.

Design, Setting, and Participants  For this prognostic study, data were extracted from longitudinal electronic health record data comprising International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnoses, laboratory test results, procedures codes, and medications for more than 3.7 million patients from 5 independent health care systems participating in the Accessible Research Commons for Health network. Across sites, 6 to 17 years’ worth of data were available, up to 2018. Outcomes were defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes reflecting incident suicide attempts (with positive predictive value >0.70 according to expert clinician medical record review). Models were trained using naive Bayes classifiers in each of the 5 systems. Models were cross-validated in independent data sets at each site, and performance metrics were calculated. Data analysis was performed from November 2017 to August 2019.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The primary outcome was suicide attempt as defined by a previously validated case definition using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. The accuracy and timeliness of the prediction were measured at each site.

Results  Across the 5 health care systems, of the 3 714 105 patients (2 130 454 female [57.2%]) included in the analysis, 39 162 cases (1.1%) were identified. Predictive features varied by site but, as expected, the most common predictors reflected mental health conditions (eg, borderline personality disorder, with odds ratios of 8.1-12.9, and bipolar disorder, with odds ratios of 0.9-9.1) and substance use disorders (eg, drug withdrawal syndrome, with odds ratios of 7.0-12.9). Despite variation in geographical location, demographic characteristics, and population health characteristics, model performance was similar across sites, with areas under the curve ranging from 0.71 (95% CI, 0.70-0.72) to 0.76 (95% CI, 0.75-0.77). Across sites, at a specificity of 90%, the models detected a mean of 38% of cases a mean of 2.1 years in advance.

Conclusions and Relevance  Across 5 diverse health care systems, a computationally efficient approach leveraging the full spectrum of structured electronic health record data was able to detect the risk of suicidal behavior in unselected patients. This approach could facilitate the development of clinical decision support tools that inform risk reduction interventions.

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