PCOM Library / Archive for "Hot Topics in Research"

Category: Hot Topics in Research

Hot Topics: Lifestyle Makes a Difference in Heart Disease

Jackie Werner Cardiology, Hot Topics in Research, Internal Medicine, January

Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease Khera AV, Emdin CA, Drake I, et al. Genetic risk, adherence to a healthy lifestyle, and coronary disease. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(24):2349-2358. http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1605086. BACKGROUND Both genetic and lifestyle factors contribute to individual-level risk of coronary artery disease. The extent to which increased genetic risk can be offset by a healthy lifestyle is unknown. METHODS Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts — 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women’s…

Hot Topics: Experimental Ebola Vaccine Gives 100% Protection

Jackie Werner Hot Topics in Research, Infectious Disease, Internal Medicine, January

Efficacy and effectiveness of an rVSV-vectored vaccine in preventing Ebola virus disease: final results from the Guinea ring vaccination, open-label, cluster-randomised trial (Ebola Ça Suffit!) Henao-Restrepo A, Camacho A, Longini IM, et al. Efficacy and effectiveness of an rVSV-vectored vaccine in preventing ebola virus disease: Final results from the guinea ring vaccination, open-label, cluster-randomised trial (ebola ça suffit!). The Lancet. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32621-6. Background rVSV-ZEBOV is a recombinant, replication competent vesicular stomatitis virus-based candidate vaccine expressing a surface glycoprotein of Zaire Ebolavirus. We tested the effect of rVSV-ZEBOV in preventing Ebola virus disease in contacts and contacts of contacts of recently confirmed…

Hot Topics: Common Gene Sets Link Bipolar Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenia

Jackie Werner Hot Topics in Research, January, Mood Disorders, Psychology and Psychiatry, Schizophrenia

Consistently altered expression of gene sets in postmortem brains of individuals with major psychiatric disorders Darby M,M., Yolken R,H., Sabunciyan S. Consistently altered expression of gene sets in postmortem brains of individuals with major psychiatric disorders. Transl Psychiatry. 2016;6:e890. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/tp.2016.173. The measurement of gene expression in postmortem brain is an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of serious psychiatric disorders. We hypothesized that major molecular deficits associated with psychiatric disease would affect the entire brain, and such deficits may be shared across disorders. We performed RNA sequencing and quantified gene expression in the hippocampus of 100 brains in the Stanley…

A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012

PJ Grier Alzheimer Disease, December, Dementia, Hot Topics in Research

A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012 Importance  The aging of the US population is expected to lead to a large increase in the number of adults with dementia, but some recent studies in the United States and other high-income countries suggest that the age-specific risk of dementia may have declined over the past 25 years. Clarifying current and future population trends in dementia prevalence and risk has important implications for patients, families, and government programs. Objective  To compare the prevalence of dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012. Design,…

Phenotype-Specific Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

PJ Grier Cardiology, coronary artery disease, December, Hot Topics in Research

Phenotype-Specific Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF; HFpEF) accounts for 50% of HF cases, and its prevalence relative to HF with reduced EF continues to rise. In contrast to HF with reduced EF, large trials testing neurohumoral inhibition in HFpEF failed to reach a positive outcome. This failure was recently attributed to distinct systemic and myocardial signaling in HFpEF and to diversity of HFpEF phenotypes. In this review, an HFpEF treatment strategy is proposed that addresses HFpEF-specific signaling and phenotypic diversity. In HFpEF, extracardiac comorbidities such as metabolic risk, arterial…

Sexual Health in Women Affected by Cancer: Focus on Sexual Pain

PJ Grier December, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Sexual Health in Women Affected by Cancer: Focus on Sexual Pain As cancer therapies improve, the number of women surviving or living long lives with cancer continues to increase. Treatment modalities, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, affect sexual function and may cause sexual pain through a variety of mechanisms, depending on treatment type. Adverse sexual effects resulting from ovarian damage, anatomic alterations, and neurologic, myofascial, or pelvic organ injury may affect more than half of women affected by cancer. Despite the fact that no specialty is better qualified to render care for this consequence of cancer treatments, many…

Ethics Reporting in Biospecimen and Genetic Research: Current Practice and Suggestions for Changes

PJ Grier Ethics, Hot Topics in Research, September

Ethics Reporting in Biospecimen and Genetic Research: Current Practice and Suggestions for Changes Modern approaches for research with human biospecimens employ a variety of substantially different types of ethics approval and informed consent. In most cases, standard ethics reporting such as “consent and approval was obtained” is no longer meaningful. A structured analysis of 120 biospecimen studies recently published in top journals revealed that more than 85% reported on consent and approval, but in more than 90% of cases, this reporting was insufficient and thus potentially misleading. Editorial policies, reporting guidelines, and material transfer agreements should include recommendations for meaningful…

What’s Wrong with Human/Nonhuman Chimera Research?

PJ Grier Hot Topics in Research, Research Commentary, September

Perspective: What’s Wrong with Human/Nonhuman Chimera Research? The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is poised to lift its funding moratorium on research involving chimeric human/nonhuman embryos, pending further consideration by an NIH steering committee. The kinds of ethical concerns that seem to underlie this research and chimera research more generally can be adequately addressed.   Hyun I (2016) What’s Wrong with Human/ Nonhuman Chimera Research? PLoS Biol 14(8): e1002535. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002535

Equal work for unequal pay: the gender reimbursement gap for healthcare providers in the United States

PJ Grier Hot Topics in Research, News, September

Equal work for unequal pay: the gender reimbursement gap for healthcare providers in the United States ABSTRACT Introduction Gender disparities in income continue to exist, and many studies have quantified the gap between male and female workers. These studies paint an incomplete picture of gender income disparity because of their reliance on notoriously inaccurate or incomplete surveys. We quantified gender reimbursement disparity between female and male healthcare providers using objective, non-self-reported data and attempted to adjust the disparity against commonly held beliefs as to why it exists. Methods We analysed over three million publicly available Medicare reimbursement claims for calendar…