PCOM Library / Hot Topics in Research / Months / Archive for "December"

Category: December

A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012

PJ Grier Alzheimer Disease, December, Dementia, Hot Topics in Research

A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012 Importance  The aging of the US population is expected to lead to a large increase in the number of adults with dementia, but some recent studies in the United States and other high-income countries suggest that the age-specific risk of dementia may have declined over the past 25 years. Clarifying current and future population trends in dementia prevalence and risk has important implications for patients, families, and government programs. Objective  To compare the prevalence of dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012. Design,…

Phenotype-Specific Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

PJ Grier Cardiology, coronary artery disease, December, Hot Topics in Research

Phenotype-Specific Treatment of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF; HFpEF) accounts for 50% of HF cases, and its prevalence relative to HF with reduced EF continues to rise. In contrast to HF with reduced EF, large trials testing neurohumoral inhibition in HFpEF failed to reach a positive outcome. This failure was recently attributed to distinct systemic and myocardial signaling in HFpEF and to diversity of HFpEF phenotypes. In this review, an HFpEF treatment strategy is proposed that addresses HFpEF-specific signaling and phenotypic diversity. In HFpEF, extracardiac comorbidities such as metabolic risk, arterial…

Sexual Health in Women Affected by Cancer: Focus on Sexual Pain

PJ Grier December, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Sexual Health in Women Affected by Cancer: Focus on Sexual Pain As cancer therapies improve, the number of women surviving or living long lives with cancer continues to increase. Treatment modalities, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, affect sexual function and may cause sexual pain through a variety of mechanisms, depending on treatment type. Adverse sexual effects resulting from ovarian damage, anatomic alterations, and neurologic, myofascial, or pelvic organ injury may affect more than half of women affected by cancer. Despite the fact that no specialty is better qualified to render care for this consequence of cancer treatments, many…