Month: February 2017

Hot Topics: Peer-Reviewed Blog Introduces New Medical Researchers to Publishing

Jackie Werner Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Research Commentary, Uncategorized

Coached Peer Review: Developing the Next Generation of Authors Sidalak D, Purdy E, Luckett-Gatopoulos S, Murray H, Thoma B, Chan TM. Coached peer review: Developing the next generation of authors. Academic Medicine. 2017;92(2):201-204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001224. Problem Publishing in academic journals is challenging for learners. Those who pass the initial stages of internal review by an editor often find the anonymous peer review process harsh. Academic blogs offer alternate avenues for publishing medical education material. Many blogs, however, lack a peer review process, which some consumers argue compromises the quality of materials published. Approach CanadiEM (formerly BoringEM) is an academic educational emergency…

Hot Topics: Larger Racial Disparity in Cervical Cancer Gap Than Previously Estimated

Jackie Werner Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States Beavis AL, Gravitt PE, Rositch AF. Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States. Cancer. 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30507. BACKGROUND The objectives of this study were to determine the age-standardized and age-specific annual US cervical cancer mortality rates after correction for the prevalence of hysterectomy and to evaluate disparities by age and race. METHODS Estimates for deaths due to cervical cancer stratified by age, state, year, and race were derived from the National Center for Health Statistics county mortality data (2000-2012). Equivalently…

Hot Topics: New Free Database Crowdsources Cancer Mutation Research

Jackie Werner Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

CIViC is a Community Knowledgebase for Expert Crowdsourcing the Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer Griffith M, Spies NC, Krysiak K, et al. CIViC is a community knowledgebase for expert crowdsourcing the clinical interpretation of variants in cancer. Nat Genet. 2017;49(2):170-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3774. CIViC is an expert-crowdsourced knowledgebase for Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer describing the therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic and predisposing relevance of inherited and somatic variants of all types. CIViC is committed to open-source code, open-access content, public application programming interfaces (APIs) and provenance of supporting evidence to allow for the transparent creation of current and accurate variant interpretations…

Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI) trial

Richard Saldivar Front Page, Library News, New Resources

The PCOM Library is offering a one month trial to the Journal of Medical Insight. JoMI is a surgical video journal / virtual operating theater that seeks to impact health care and education through filming and publishing surgical procedures performed by top teaching physicians. JoMI was filmed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and other top institutions and, at present, primarily focuses on orthopedics, orthopedic trauma, and general surgery and patient care. Access from the web, tablet, laptop and smartphones. You need only to create an account on JoMI.com and list Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine as the…

Hot Topics: Women in Poverty More at Risk for Heart Attacks Than Men

Jackie Werner Cardiology, Front Page, Hot Topics in Research

Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis Backholer K, Peters SAE, Bots SH, Peeters A, Huxley RR, Woodward M. Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2016-207890. Background Low socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but whether its effects are comparable in women and men is unknown. Methods PubMed MEDLINE was systematically searched. Studies that reported sex-specific estimates, and associated variability, of the relative risk (RR) for coronary heart disease…