Visualization of regional tau deposits using 3H-THK5117 in Alzheimer brain tissue

Visualization of regional tau deposits using 3H-THK5117 in Alzheimer brain tissue

Abstract

 The accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles, composed of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein, starts spreading early in specific regions in the course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), correlating with the progression of memory dysfunction. The non-invasive imaging of tau could therefore facilitate the early diagnosis of AD, differentiate it from other dementing disorders and allow evaluation of tau immunization therapy outcomes. In this study we characterized the in vitro binding properties of THK5117, a tentative radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tau brain deposits.

Results

Saturation and competition binding studies of 3H-THK5117 in post-mortem AD brain tissue showed the presence of multiple binding sites. THK5117 binding was significantly higher in hippocampal (p < 0.001) and temporal (p < 0.01) tissue homogenates in AD compared to controls. Autoradiography studies with 3H-THK5117 was performed on large frozen brain sections from three AD cases who had been followed clinically and earlier undergone in vivo 18F-FDG PET investigations. The three AD cases showed distinct differences in regional THK5117 binding that were also observed in tau immunohistopathology as well as in clinical presentation. A negative correlation between in vivo 18F-FDG PET and in vitro 3H-THK5117 autoradiography was observed in two of the three AD cases.

Conclusions

This study supports that new tau PET tracers will provide further understanding on the role of tau pathology in the diversity of the clinical presentation in AD.

Acta Neuropathologica Communications20153:40, DOI: 10.1186/s40478-015-0220-4; Lemoine et al. 2015; Received: 14 June 2015; Accepted: 15 June 2015; Published: 2 July 2015
Posted in Alzheimer Disease, April, Hot Topics in Research

Library OneSearch+ Reading Lists

We are proud to announce the availability of Library OneSearch+ Reading Lists!

PCOM Library OneSearch+ Reading Lists offers faculty an easy way to create and manage course reading lists directly inside Blackboard.

Library OneSearch+ Reading Lists brings the world of quality full-text ebooks and other digital resources from the library’s online collection easily and directly into the online learning environment for faculty and students.

Contact us or see the Library OneSearch+ Reading List guide for more information.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

6th Annual PCOM Research Day

We are proud to announce the 6th Annual PCOM Research Days! All members of the PCOM community are invited to a celebration of Research, Innovation, Scholarship and Creativity with a day of poster presentations on the Georgia and Philadelphia Campuses, sponsored by the CCDA, the PCOM chapter of Sigma Xi, the National Research Honor Society and the Division of Research.

2016 research day schedule outline

Georgia Campus

Georgia’s poster session will be held May 10, 2016.

The official poster competition will be from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm in the Atrium. Judging will commence at 1:00 pm.

The 6th Annual PCOM Research Day Georgia keynote speaker will be Dr. Donald Harn of University of Georgia who will deliver the keynote lecture from noon -1:00 pm in Lecture Hall A.

Georgia poster boards are 3 feet in height and 4 feet in width, so the posters will need to be a little smaller than the boards.

For more information on poster guidelines click here.

You can submit the PCOM marketing research poster request form here. Alternatively, you can access a pdf version of the request form here.

Philadelphia Campus

Philadelphia’s poster session will be held on May 11, 2016.

The official poster competition will be from 1:00 – 4:00 pm in the OMM Lab of Evans Hall. Lunch will be provided throughout the poster session and judging will commence at 1:00 pm.

The 6th Annual PCOM Research Day Philadelphia keynote speaker will be Dr. Maria T. Schultheis of Drexel University who will deliver the keynote lecture from noon – 1:00 pm in Zedeck Auditorium on “Clinical Application of Virtual Reality Technology: the Good, the Bad and … the Challenging.”

Philadelphia poster dimensions may not exceed 4’x6’ (48”x72”).

For more information on poster guidelines click here.

You can submit the PCOM marketing research poster request form here. Alternatively, you can access a pdf version of the request form here.

Posted in Front Page, Library News, Uncategorized

Scheduled Refworks Downtime – March 12, 2016

On Saturday, March 12, 2016, ProQuest will be upgrading its systems infrastructure. ProQuest platforms (including Refworks and Digital Dissertations) will be unavailable beginning at at 10:00 PM Eastern Standard Time and will last for 8 hours.

Posted in Service Disruptions

The Yellow Wall-Paper Traveling Exhibit

The Literature of Prescription: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and “The Yellow Wall-Paper,” a National Library of Medicine traveling exhibit, reviews the role of late nineteenth-century medical and scientific experts in using the idea of female weakness to discourage women from participating in professional, creative, and intellectual life. The exhibit explores the story behind Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s indictment of the medical profession and the social conventions restricting women’s professional and creative opportunities.

To preserve her health, Gilman was advised by a physician to “live as domestic a life as far as possible… And never touch pen, brush, or pencil again” as long as she lived. After three months of following the advice of her physician, she returned to writing. In two days she wrote “The Yellow Wall-Paper,” a story about a young woman driven mad by the “rest cure” advocated by the medical profession. Readers found the story to be intriguing and disturbing; today, it is considered a classic of feminist literature. Gilman became an influential writer and speaker about women’s rights and economic independence. A digital version of “The Yellow Wall-Paper” from the January 1892 issue of The New England Magazine is available, courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.

The exhibit will be on display Monday, March 7, through Saturday, April 16 in the GA-PCOM Atrium. For more information about the exhibit, please contact Skye Bickett at 678-225-7541 or skyebi@pcom.edu.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Antithrombotic Therapy for VTE Disease: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report

Antithrombotic Therapy for VTE Disease: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report

BACKGROUND: We update recommendations on 12 topics that were in the 9th edition of these guidelines, and address 3 new topics.

METHODS: We generate strong (Grade 1) and weak (Grade 2) recommendations based on high- (Grade A), moderate- (Grade B), and low- (Grade C) quality evidence.

RESULTS: For VTE and no cancer, as long-term anticoagulant therapy, we suggest dabigatran (Grade 2B), rivaroxaban (Grade 2B), apixaban (Grade 2B), or edoxaban (Grade 2B) over vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy, and suggest VKA therapy over low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; Grade 2C). For VTE and cancer, we suggest LMWH over VKA (Grade 2B), dabigatran (Grade 2C), rivaroxaban (Grade 2C), apixaban (Grade 2C), or edoxaban (Grade 2C). We have not changed recommendations for who should stop anticoagulation at 3 months or receive extended therapy. For VTE treated with anticoagulants, we recommend against an inferior vena cava filter (Grade 1B). For DVT, we suggest not using compression stockings routinely to prevent PTS (Grade 2B). For subsegmental pulmonary embolism and no proximal DVT, we suggest clinical surveillance over anticoagulation with a low risk of recurrent VTE (Grade 2C), and anticoagulation over clinical surveillance with a high risk (Grade 2C). We suggest thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism with hypotension (Grade 2B), and systemic therapy over catheter-directed thrombolysis (Grade 2C). For recurrent VTE on a non-LMWH anticoagulant, we suggest LMWH (Grade 2C); for recurrent VTE on LMWH, we suggest increasing the LMWH dose (Grade 2C).

CONCLUSIONS: Of 54 recommendations included in the 30 statements, 20 were strong and none was based on high-quality evidence, highlighting the need for further research.

 

CHEST 2016; 149(2):315-352

Clive Kearon, MD, PhD; Elie A. Akl, MD, MPH, PhD; Joseph Ornelas, PhD; Allen Blaivas, DO, FCCP; David Jimenez, MD, PhD, FCCP; Henri Bounameaux, MD; Menno Huisman, MD, PhD; Christopher S. King, MD, FCCP; Timothy A. Morris, MD, FCCP; Namita Sood, MD, FCCP; Scott M. Stevens, MD; Janine R. E. Vintch, MD, FCCP; Philip Wells, MD; Scott C. Woller, MD; and COL Lisa Moores, MD, FCCP

Posted in Blood, Hot Topics in Research, Lung, March, Research Commentary

Atrial fibrillation as risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death in women compared with men: systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

Atrial fibrillation as risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death in women compared with men: systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

Abstract

Objective To determine whether atrial fibrillation is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death in women compared with men.

Design Meta-analysis of cohort studies.

Data sources Studies published between January 1966 and March 2015, identified through a systematic search of Medline and Embase and review of references.

Eligibility for selecting studies Cohort studies with a minimum of 50 participants with and 50 without atrial fibrillation that reported sex specific associations between atrial fibrillation and all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke, cardiac events (cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction), and heart failure.

Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted study characteristics and maximally adjusted sex specific relative risks. Inverse variance weighted random effects meta-analysis was used to pool sex specific relative risks and their ratio.

Results 30 studies with 4 371 714 participants were identified. Atrial fibrillation was associated with a higher risk of all cause mortality in women (ratio of relative risks for women compared with men 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.17) and a significantly stronger risk of stroke (1.99, 1.46 to 2.71), cardiovascular mortality (1.93, 1.44 to 2.60), cardiac events (1.55, 1.15 to 2.08), and heart failure (1.16, 1.07 to 1.27). Results were broadly consistent in sensitivity analyses.

Conclusion Atrial fibrillation is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death in women compared with men, though further research would be needed to determine any causality.

 

Connor A Emdin, DPhil; Christopher X Wong; Allan J Hsiao; Douglas G Altman; Sanne AE Peters; Mark Woodward; Ayodele A Odutayo

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h7013 (Published 19 January 2016)

 

Posted in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiology, Hot Topics in Research, March

Zebrafish Reel in Phenotypic Suppressors of Autism

Zebrafish Reel in Phenotypic Suppressors of Autism

Chemical genetics can help decipher novel pathways underlying neurodevelopmental psychiatric impairments. Hoffman et al. (2016) utilized behavioral profiling of psychoactive compounds in zebrafish and identified estrogens as suppressors of a phenotype resulting from loss of an autism risk gene.

Neuron, Volume 89, Issue 4, 17 February 2016, Pages 673–675

Posted in Brain, Hot Topics in Research, March Tagged with:

Mental Health of Transgender Children Who Are Supported in Their Identities

Mental Health of Transgender Children Who Are Supported in Their Identities

OBJECTIVE: Transgender children who have socially transitioned, that is, who identify as the gender “opposite” their natal sex and are supported to live openly as that gender, are increasingly visible in society, yet we know nothing about their mental health. Previous work with children with gender identity disorder (GID; now termed gender dysphoria) has found remarkably high rates of anxiety and depression in these children. Here we examine, for the first time, mental health in a sample of socially transitioned transgender children.

METHODS: A community-based national sample of transgender, prepubescent children (n= 73, aged 3–12 years), along with control groups of nontransgender children in the same age range (n = 73 age- and gender-matched community controls; n = 49 sibling of transgender participants), were recruited as part of the TransYouth Project. Parents completed anxiety and depression measures.

RESULTS: Transgender children showed no elevations in depression and slightly elevated anxiety relative to population averages. They did not differ from the control groups on depression symptoms and had only marginally higher anxiety symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS: Socially transitioned transgender children who are supported in their gender identity have developmentally normative levels of depression and only minimal elevations in anxiety, suggesting that psychopathology is not inevitable within this group. Especially striking is the comparison with reports of children with GID; socially transitioned transgender children have notably lower rates of internalizing psychopathology than previously reported among children with GID living as their natal sex.

 

Kristina R. Olson, Lily Durwood, Madeleine DeMeules, Katie A. McLaughlin

Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

March 2016, VOLUME 137 / ISSUE 3

Posted in Hot Topics in Research, March, Pediatrics

Wise-MD Trial Access (MedU Surgery Module)

WISE-MD is a series of 35 web-based modules created to enhance the surgical education of medical students and health care professionals by providing high quality content on common surgical conditions. The modules address topics typically taught during the surgical clerkship such as appendicitis, biliary tract disease, breast cancer, thyroid disease, hernia and more.

Most of the modules have self-assessment questions. Modules are illustrated with video and animation.

Currently 115 medical and osteopathic schools currently use WISE-MD as part of their clerkship curriculum. Reports are available for clerkship directors regarding usage of the modules by individual students.

Students can self register for MedU using their pcom.edu email address and will automatically get access to WISE-MD. See MedU Registration Instructions.

Instructors who want access to WISE-MD will need to register and request access for approval.

Did you find this resource useful? Please send comments to library@pcom.edu.

Posted in Front Page, Library News, New Resources

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