Epocrates

The Library would like to make you aware of the termination of our academic license to Epocrates, as of May 31, 2017.

AthenaHealth, the parent company to this resource, is transforming the product and is not currently renewing licenses.

We would like to be able to continue purchase of this content to support our curricula for a reasonable price, and will keep the PCOM community updated as we learn more.

Posted in Library News

Hot Topics: Most Pediatric Flu Deaths Could Be Prevented With Flu Shot

Influenza vaccine effectiveness against pediatric deaths: 2010–2014

Flannery B, Reynolds SB, Blanton L, et al. Influenza vaccine effectiveness against pediatric deaths: 2010–2014. Pediatrics. 2017;139(5). doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-4244.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths since 2004 has shown that most deaths occur in unvaccinated children. We assessed whether influenza vaccination reduced the risk of influenza-associated death in children and adolescents.

METHODS: We conducted a case–cohort analysis comparing vaccination uptake among laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths with estimated vaccination coverage among pediatric cohorts in the United States. Case vaccination and high-risk status were determined by case investigation. Influenza vaccination coverage estimates were obtained from national survey data or a national insurance claims database. We estimated odds ratios from logistic regression comparing odds of vaccination among cases with odds of vaccination in comparison cohorts. We used Bayesian methods to compute 95% credible intervals (CIs) for vaccine effectiveness (VE), calculated as (1 − odds ratio) × 100.

RESULTS: From July 2010 through June 2014, 358 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported among children aged 6 months through 17 years. Vaccination status was determined for 291 deaths; 75 (26%) received vaccine before illness onset. Average vaccination coverage in survey cohorts was 48%. Overall VE against death was 65% (95% CI, 54% to 74%). Among 153 deaths in children with underlying high-risk medical conditions, 47 (31%) were vaccinated. VE among children with high-risk conditions was 51% (95% CI, 31% to 67%), compared with 65% (95% CI, 47% to 78%) among children without high-risk conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: Influenza vaccination was associated with reduced risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric death. Increasing influenza vaccination could prevent influenza-associated deaths among children and adolescents.

Posted in Hot Topics in Research, Infectious Disease

7th Annual PCOM Research Days Winners

Thank you to the participants and attendees who made Research Day a success. Congratulations to the 2017 Research Day award winners!

Georgia Campus

Excellence in Research-Biomedical Sciences

First place: Moji Salau, “BKCa Channel Expression and Functional Regulation in Diabetic Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.” and Shelby Sweat, “Analysis of the Effects of TGF-β Mediated Reduction of Caveolin-1 Expression Following Cellular Interaction with a Biological Extracellular Matrix.”

Second place: Christina Paul, “The Role of Lipocalin -2 (Lcn2) in Acetaminophen Induced Acute Liver Failure.”

Honorable mention: Nisha Gajjar, “The role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) inhibitor Varespladib in mitigation of acetaminophen(APAP) induced acute liver failure.” and Elizabeth Hernandez, “Anti-Cancer Effect of Fluorinated Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (FCAPE) on Human Multiple Myeloma Cells.”

Excellence in Research-Pharmaceutical Sciences

First place: Teena John, “Anti-myeloma Effect of Imidazole and Methyl Derivatives of a Synthetic Oleanane Triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO).”

Second place: Eva Karam, “Management of HIV-positive Patients Undergoing CABG: A Case Series.”

Honorable mention: Irandokht Khaki Najafabadi, “Magnetic Drug Delivery of Xanthohumol to Adipocytes using Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.”

Excellence in Research-DO Program

First place: Andrew Keith, “Cerebellar and Cerebral Cortical Responses to Cathodal tDCS: An In Vivo Approach to Study its Applicability to Cerebellar Ataxia Treatment.”

Second place: Alex Wang, “Study of Excitability Changes in Purkinje Cell Output During DCS Stimulation by In Vitro Approach.”

Excellence in Research-Residents/Fellows

First place: Brandon Cunningham, “Appropriateness of Statin Dose in High Risk Patients Post-PCI/CABG at Gwinnett Medical Center.”

Second place: Cynthia Francis, PhD, “Cyclosporine A-Induced Calcineurin Isoform Specific Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) Expression in Renal Fibroblasts.”

Honorable mention: Keith Johnson, “Pharmacist Intervention on the Stroke Team in the Emergency Department.”

Philadelphia Campus

The David Miller, DO ’60 Memorial Endowed Research Day Awards

Excellence in Research – Best in Show: Mihoko Tantabe, “Family Planning in Refugee Settings: Findings from a Multi-Country Study.”

Excellence in Research – Psychology: Noah Sideman, “Task fMRI and Functional Connectivity Show Concordant Memory Laterality in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.”

Excellence in Research – Masters in Biomedical Sciences: Anahi McIntyre, “Protein Kinase C Epsilon Peptide Inhibitor Exerts Cardioprotective Effects in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.”

Excellence in Alzheimer’s Disease Research: Vanessa Valdivia, “Evaluation of Smell and miRNA Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).”

The Camille DiLullo, PhD, Excellence in Research Awards

DO award: Morgan McCoy, “Assessment of Clinicians’ Knowledge and Screening Practices of Stimulant Misuse in Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.”

Resident award: Mark Ishak, DO, “Minimally Invasive In Vivo Real-time Identification of Human Astrocytoma with Sulforhodamine 101.”

Staff award: Danielle Exler, “Determining Whether Seizures During Early Development Lead to Long-term Behavioral Deficits in Zebrafish.”

PCOM Library Young Investigators Award

Alixandria Colon, Omayris Ramos and Tracy Wong, of Olney Charter High School in Philadelphia, “Understanding Cervical and Breast Cancer.”

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Hot Topics: PTSD in Women Strongly Linked to Genetics

Largest GWAS of PTSD (N=20 070) yields genetic overlap with schizophrenia and sex differences in heritability

Duncan L,E., Ratanatharathorn A, Aiello A,E., et al. Largest GWAS of PTSD (N=20thinsp]070) yields genetic overlap with schizophrenia and sex differences in heritability. Mol Psychiatry. 2017.

The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder group (PGC-PTSD) combined genome-wide case–control molecular genetic data across 11 multiethnic studies to quantify PTSD heritability, to examine potential shared genetic risk with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder and to identify risk loci for PTSD. Examining 20730 individuals, we report a molecular genetics-based heritability estimate (h2SNP) for European-American females of 29% that is similar to h2SNP for schizophrenia and is substantially higher than h2SNP in European-American males (estimate not distinguishable from zero). We found strong evidence of overlapping genetic risk between PTSD and schizophrenia along with more modest evidence of overlap with bipolar and major depressive disorder. No single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exceeded genome-wide significance in the transethnic (overall) meta-analysis and we do not replicate previously reported associations. Still, SNP-level summary statistics made available here afford the best-available molecular genetic index of PTSD—for both European- and African-American individuals—and can be used in polygenic risk prediction and genetic correlation studies of diverse phenotypes. Publication of summary statistics for ~10000 African Americans contributes to the broader goal of increased ancestral diversity in genomic data resources. In sum, the results demonstrate genetic influences on the development of PTSD, identify shared genetic risk between PTSD and other psychiatric disorders and highlight the importance of multiethnic/racial samples. As has been the case with schizophrenia and other complex genetic disorders, larger sample sizes are needed to identify specific risk loci.

Posted in Anxiety Disorders, Hot Topics in Research, Psychology and Psychiatry

Hot Topics: First Tardive Dyskinesia Drug Approved by FDA

FDA approves first drug to treat tardive dyskinesia

Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017). FDA approves first drug to treat tardive dyskinesia. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm552418.htm.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today [April 11, 2017] approved Ingrezza (valbenazine) capsules to treat adults with tardive dyskinesia. This is the first drug approved by the FDA for this condition.

Tardive dyskinesia is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive involuntary movements, usually of the jaw, lips and tongue, such as grimacing, sticking out the tongue and smacking the lips. Some affected people also experience involuntary movement of the extremities or difficulty breathing.

Posted in Hot Topics in Research, Neurology, Psychology and Psychiatry

Hot Topics: Visual Abstracts Increase Reach of Research

Graphic showing findings of Visual Abstracts Increase Article Dissemination study

Credit Andrew Ibrahim, University of Michigan/Annals of Surgery

Visual Abstracts to Disseminate Research on Social Media: A Prospective, Case-control Crossover Study

Ibrahim AM, Lillemoe KD, Klingensmith ME, Dimick JB. Visual abstracts to disseminate research on social media: A prospective, case-control crossover study. Ann Surg. 2017. doi: 10.1097/SLA.0000000000002277.

Nearly all major academic research journals have adopted social media platforms, such as Twitter, to disseminate their publications and make them more accessible to readers. One recent study suggested that articles featured on Twitter may be 3 times more likely to be read versus those that were not. Despite the widespread adoption of Twitter by academic journals, the extent to which the social media platforms and strategies can influence practical outcomes, such as number of article reads, remain understudied.

In July of 2016, Annals of Surgery adopted the use of ‘‘visual abstracts’’ as a novel strategy to improve dissemination of the journal’s publications. A visual abstract is simply a visual representation of the key findings typically found in the abstract portion of an article. They are produced by the journal after an article is accepted. Examples can be found in Figure 1. As of March 2017, more than 15 journals have utilized visual abstracts in their social media dissemination strategy, yet no data exist describing how their use impacts dissemination of publications.

In this context, a case-control crossover study was conducted to compare tweets that included only the title of the article versus tweets that contain the title and a visual abstract. Such information would be valuable to help journals and authors understand the impact of different dissemination strategies for their publications.

Posted in Hot Topics in Research, Research and Scholarly Communication

Hot Topics: FDA Approves First Drug For Severe Multiple Sclerosis

FDA approves new drug to treat multiple sclerosis

Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017). FDA approves new drug to treat multiple sclerosis. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm549325.htm.

On March 28, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) to treat adult patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). This is the first drug approved by the FDA for PPMS. Ocrevus is an intravenous infusion given by a health care professional.

“Multiple sclerosis can have a profound impact on a person’s life,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This therapy not only provides another treatment option for those with relapsing MS, but for the first time provides an approved therapy for those with primary progressive MS.”

Posted in Central Nervous System Disorders, Hot Topics in Research

Hot Topics: Training Medical Students to Organize Needle Exchange Programs

Students as effective harm reductionists and needle exchange organizers

Barbour K, McQuade M, Brown B. Students as effective harm reductionists and needle exchange organizers. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy. 2017;12(15). http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13011-017-0099-0.

Background
Needle exchange programs are safe, highly effective programs for promoting health among people who inject drugs. However, they remain poorly funded, and often illegal, in many places worldwide due to fear and stigma surrounding drug use. Continued advocacy, education, and implementation of new needle exchanges are thus essential to improve public health and reduce structural inequality.

Commentary
We argue that students, and especially professional and graduate students, have the potential to play an important role in advancing harm reduction. Students benefit from the respect given to the professions they are training to enter, which gives them leverage to navigate the political hurdles often faced by needle exchange organizers, especially in areas that presently lack services. In addition, due to their relative simplicity, needle exchanges do not require much of the licensing, clinical knowledge, and infrastructure associated with more traditional student programs, such as student-run free medical clinics. Students are capable of learning harm reduction cultural approaches and techniques if they remain humble, open-minded, and seek the help of the harm reduction community. Consequently, students can generate tremendous benefits to their community without performing beyond their appropriate clinical limitations.

Students benefit from organizing needle exchanges by gaining applied experience in advocacy, organization-building, and political finesse. Working in a needle exchange significantly helps erode stigma against multiple marginalized populations. Students in health-related professions additionally learn clinically-relevant knowledge that is often lacking from their formal training, such as an understanding of structural violence and inequality, root causes of substance use, client-centered approaches to health services, and interacting with clients as peers, rather than through the standard hierarchical medical interaction.

Conclusion
We therefore encourage students to learn about and consider organizing needle exchanges during their training. Our experience is that students can be successful in developing sustainable programs which benefit their clients, the broader harm reduction movement, and themselves alike.

 

Posted in Hot Topics in Research, Substance Use Disorders

New York Times Group Pass

The New Yorks Times have updated their registration process.

To register for your free access to the New York Times, go to https://myaccount.nytimes.com/grouppass/access. Click “Create Account” and follow the instructions to create an account using your pcom.edu email.

Students will now need to provide thier anticipated graduation date. Student access will be valid up to their anticipated graduation date.

Faculty and Staff passes are good for one year.

Once activated, your Pass will provide access to NYTimes.com from any location.

For all users, upon expiration of your pass, you can extend your access by signing in with your New York Times account at the New York Times Group Pass activation page.

You may also download the NYT smartphone app and log in. The NYT app is available for Android and Apple devices.

To view a short how-to video on how to activate a Group Pass, please visit http://bit.ly/1qJzB4g

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Hot Topics: Cardiologists Weigh In On Nutrition Facts and Fads

Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies

Freeman AM, Morris PB, Barnard N, et al. Trending cardiovascular nutrition controversies. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017;69(9):1172-1187. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2016.10.086.

The potential cardiovascular benefits of several trending foods and dietary patterns are still incompletely understood, and nutritional science continues to evolve. However, in the meantime, a number of controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media exposure and are mired by hype. This review addresses some of the more popular foods and dietary patterns that are promoted for cardiovascular health to provide clinicians with accurate information for patient discussions in the clinical setting.

Posted in Cardiology, Hot Topics in Research, Nutrition