Category: Front Page

Scheduled Refworks Downtime – July 29, 2017

On Saturday, July 29, 2017, ProQuest will be upgrading its systems infrastructure. ProQuest platforms (including Refworks and Digital Dissertations) will be unavailable beginning at at 3:00 PM Eastern Standard Time and will last for 9 hours.

Posted in Front Page, Service Disruptions

Hot Topics: Unnecessary Antibiotics in Hospitals Can Cause Adverse Events

Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients

Tamma PD, Avdic E, Li DX, Dzintars K, Cosgrove SE. Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients. JAMA Intern Med. Published online June 12, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1938

Importance  Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable.

Objective  To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy.

Design, Setting, and Participants  Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center.

Exposures  At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians.

Results  In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non–clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics.

Conclusions and Relevance  Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Internal Medicine, Pharmaceutical Sciences

Free Epocrates Access for One Year

Epocrates is providing all medical students with one year free premium access.

Follow this link to enable access. If you already have the app, you’ll need to slide over to the update button once you register. Be sure to click apply to the 2017 MedStudent code.

Activate a free subscription.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

7th Annual PCOM Research Days Winners

Thank you to the participants and attendees who made Research Day a success. Congratulations to the 2017 Research Day award winners!

Georgia Campus

Excellence in Research-Biomedical Sciences

First place: Moji Salau, “BKCa Channel Expression and Functional Regulation in Diabetic Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.” and Shelby Sweat, “Analysis of the Effects of TGF-β Mediated Reduction of Caveolin-1 Expression Following Cellular Interaction with a Biological Extracellular Matrix.”

Second place: Christina Paul, “The Role of Lipocalin -2 (Lcn2) in Acetaminophen Induced Acute Liver Failure.”

Honorable mention: Nisha Gajjar, “The role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) inhibitor Varespladib in mitigation of acetaminophen(APAP) induced acute liver failure.” and Elizabeth Hernandez, “Anti-Cancer Effect of Fluorinated Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (FCAPE) on Human Multiple Myeloma Cells.”

Excellence in Research-Pharmaceutical Sciences

First place: Teena John, “Anti-myeloma Effect of Imidazole and Methyl Derivatives of a Synthetic Oleanane Triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO).”

Second place: Eva Karam, “Management of HIV-positive Patients Undergoing CABG: A Case Series.”

Honorable mention: Irandokht Khaki Najafabadi, “Magnetic Drug Delivery of Xanthohumol to Adipocytes using Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.”

Excellence in Research-DO Program

First place: Andrew Keith, “Cerebellar and Cerebral Cortical Responses to Cathodal tDCS: An In Vivo Approach to Study its Applicability to Cerebellar Ataxia Treatment.”

Second place: Alex Wang, “Study of Excitability Changes in Purkinje Cell Output During DCS Stimulation by In Vitro Approach.”

Excellence in Research-Residents/Fellows

First place: Brandon Cunningham, “Appropriateness of Statin Dose in High Risk Patients Post-PCI/CABG at Gwinnett Medical Center.”

Second place: Cynthia Francis, PhD, “Cyclosporine A-Induced Calcineurin Isoform Specific Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) Expression in Renal Fibroblasts.”

Honorable mention: Keith Johnson, “Pharmacist Intervention on the Stroke Team in the Emergency Department.”

Philadelphia Campus

The David Miller, DO ’60 Memorial Endowed Research Day Awards

Excellence in Research – Best in Show: Mihoko Tantabe, “Family Planning in Refugee Settings: Findings from a Multi-Country Study.”

Excellence in Research – Psychology: Noah Sideman, “Task fMRI and Functional Connectivity Show Concordant Memory Laterality in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.”

Excellence in Research – Masters in Biomedical Sciences: Anahi McIntyre, “Protein Kinase C Epsilon Peptide Inhibitor Exerts Cardioprotective Effects in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.”

Excellence in Alzheimer’s Disease Research: Vanessa Valdivia, “Evaluation of Smell and miRNA Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).”

The Camille DiLullo, PhD, Excellence in Research Awards

DO award: Morgan McCoy, “Assessment of Clinicians’ Knowledge and Screening Practices of Stimulant Misuse in Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.”

Resident award: Mark Ishak, DO, “Minimally Invasive In Vivo Real-time Identification of Human Astrocytoma with Sulforhodamine 101.”

Staff award: Danielle Exler, “Determining Whether Seizures During Early Development Lead to Long-term Behavioral Deficits in Zebrafish.”

PCOM Library Young Investigators Award

Alixandria Colon, Omayris Ramos and Tracy Wong, of Olney Charter High School in Philadelphia, “Understanding Cervical and Breast Cancer.”

Posted in Front Page, Library News

New York Times Group Pass

The New Yorks Times have updated their registration process.

To register for your free access to the New York Times, go to https://myaccount.nytimes.com/grouppass/access. Click “Create Account” and follow the instructions to create an account using your pcom.edu email.

Students will now need to provide thier anticipated graduation date. Student access will be valid up to their anticipated graduation date.

Faculty and Staff passes are good for one year.

Once activated, your Pass will provide access to NYTimes.com from any location.

For all users, upon expiration of your pass, you can extend your access by signing in with your New York Times account at the New York Times Group Pass activation page.

You may also download the NYT smartphone app and log in. The NYT app is available for Android and Apple devices.

To view a short how-to video on how to activate a Group Pass, please visit http://bit.ly/1qJzB4g

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI)

The PCOM Library is offering a new resource, the Journal of Medical Insight.

JoMI is a surgical video journal / virtual operating theater that seeks to impact health care and education through filming and publishing surgical procedures performed by top teaching physicians.

JoMI was filmed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and other top institutions and, at present, primarily focuses on orthopedics, orthopedic trauma, and general surgery and patient care.

Access from the web, tablet, laptop and smartphones. You need only to create an account on JoMI.com and list Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine as the “Institution”. This will allow for complete access (including off-campus and on tablets, laptops, and smartphones).

Posted in Front Page, Library News, New Resources

Hot Topics: Peer-Reviewed Blog Introduces New Medical Researchers to Publishing

Coached Peer Review: Developing the Next Generation of Authors

Sidalak D, Purdy E, Luckett-Gatopoulos S, Murray H, Thoma B, Chan TM. Coached peer review: Developing the next generation of authors. Academic Medicine. 2017;92(2):201-204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001224.

Problem
Publishing in academic journals is challenging for learners. Those who pass the initial stages of internal review by an editor often find the anonymous peer review process harsh. Academic blogs offer alternate avenues for publishing medical education material. Many blogs, however, lack a peer review process, which some consumers argue compromises the quality of materials published.

Approach
CanadiEM (formerly BoringEM) is an academic educational emergency medicine blog dedicated to publishing high-quality materials produced by learners (i.e., residents and medical students). The editorial team has designed and implemented a collaborative “coached peer review” process that comprises an open exchange among the learner–author, editors, and reviewers. The goal of this process is to facilitate the publication of high-quality academic materials by learner–authors while providing focused feedback to help them develop academic writing skills.

Outcomes
The authors of this Innovation Report surveyed (February–June 2015) their blog’s learner–authors and external expert “staff” reviewers who had participated in coached peer review for their reactions to the process. The survey results revealed that participants viewed the process positively compared with both traditional journal peer review and academic blog publication processes. Participants found the process friendly, easy, efficient, and transparent. Learner–authors also reported increased confidence in their published material. These outcomes met the goals of coached peer review.

Next Steps
CanadiEM aims to inspire continued participation in, exposure to, and high quality production of academic writing by promoting the adoption of coached peer review for online educational resources produced by learners.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Research Commentary, Uncategorized

Hot Topics: Larger Racial Disparity in Cervical Cancer Gap Than Previously Estimated

Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States

Beavis AL, Gravitt PE, Rositch AF. Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States. Cancer. 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30507.

BACKGROUND
The objectives of this study were to determine the age-standardized and age-specific annual US cervical cancer mortality rates after correction for the prevalence of hysterectomy and to evaluate disparities by age and race.

METHODS
Estimates for deaths due to cervical cancer stratified by age, state, year, and race were derived from the National Center for Health Statistics county mortality data (2000-2012). Equivalently stratified data on the prevalence of hysterectomy for women 20 years old or older from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey were used to remove women who were not at risk from the denominator. Age-specific and age-standardized mortality rates were computed, and trends in mortality rates were analyzed with Joinpoint regression.

RESULTS
Age-standardized rates were higher for both races after correction. For black women, the corrected mortality rate was 10.1 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-10.6), whereas the uncorrected rate was 5.7 per 100,000 (95% CI, 5.5-6.0). The corrected rate for white women was 4.7 per 100,000 (95% CI, 4.6-4.8), whereas the uncorrected rate was 3.2 per 100,000 (95% CI, 3.1-3.2). Without the correction, the disparity in mortality between races was underestimated by 44%. Black women who were 85 years old or older had the highest corrected rate: 37.2 deaths per 100,000. A trend analysis of corrected rates demonstrated that white women’s rates decreased at 0.8% per year, whereas the annual decrease for black women was 3.6% (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS
A correction for hysterectomy has revealed that cervical cancer mortality rates are underestimated, particularly in black women. The highest rates are seen in the oldest black women, and public health efforts should focus on appropriate screening and adequate treatment in this population. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Library Satisfaction Survey (LibQual+®)

The library satisfaction survey is now closed.  Thanks to all who participated!

Winners will be announced soon.

Results will be posted on the library website as soon as the results are analyzed.

If you have any questions please visit our LibQual+® Guide or contact the library assessment team.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Hot Topics: New Free Database Crowdsources Cancer Mutation Research

CIViC is a Community Knowledgebase for Expert Crowdsourcing the Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer

Griffith M, Spies NC, Krysiak K, et al. CIViC is a community knowledgebase for expert crowdsourcing the clinical interpretation of variants in cancer. Nat Genet. 2017;49(2):170-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3774.

CIViC is an expert-crowdsourced knowledgebase for Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer describing the therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic and predisposing relevance of inherited and somatic variants of all types. CIViC is committed to open-source code, open-access content, public application programming interfaces (APIs) and provenance of supporting evidence to allow for the transparent creation of current and accurate variant interpretations for use in cancer precision medicine.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology