Category: Front Page

Open Science Panel

The library is hosting an Open Science Panel on March 29th. This session will cover the benefits of openly sharing information, the advantages of promoting your work in the DigitalCommons@PCOM, and discuss open access journals.

Discover how publishers and other researchers view open science and what it means for you.

Lunch will be provided and an RSVP is required.

Panelists
Marian Taliaferro – AAMC
Srujana Rayalam – PCOM
Denah Appelt – PCOM
David Stout – Bepress

Georgia RSVP
March 29, 12pm-1pm, Room 1040
RSVP with Skye Bickett, skyebi@pcom.edu, by March 27

Philadelphia RSVP
March 29, 12pm-1pm, Evans 008
RSVP with PJ Grier, pjgrier@pcom.edu, by March 26

Posted in Front Page, Library News

7th Annual PCOM Research Days

We are proud to announce the 7th Annual PCOM Research Day!

All members of the PCOM community are invited to celebrate research, innovation, scholarship, and creativity with a day of poster presentations on the Georgia and Philadelphia Campuses, sponsored by the CCDA, the PCOM chapter of Sigma Xi, the National Research Honor Society, and the Division of Research.


Georgia Campus


Georgia Campus Research Day will be held on May 16, 2017.

Georgia Campus researchers can now submit abstracts here.

The submission deadline is April 28, 2017.

Georgia poster boards are 40″ x 60″, so the posters will need to be a little smaller than the boards.

For more information on Georgia abstract submission guidelines click here.

You can submit the PCOM marketing research poster request form here. Alternatively, you can access a PDF version of the request form here.


Philadelphia Campus


Philadelphia Campus Research Day will be held on May 3, 2017.

Location: Activities Center, gymnasium

Philadelphia Campus researchers can now submit abstracts here.

The submission deadline is April 7, 2017.

Philadelphia poster dimensions may not exceed 4’x6’ (48”x 72”).

For more information on Philadelphia abstract submission guidelines click here.

You can submit the PCOM marketing research poster request form here. Alternatively, you can access a PDF version of the request form here.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Hot Topics: Volunteers Improve Quality of Life for Adults in Palliative Care

How effective are volunteers at supporting people in their last year of life? A pragmatic randomised wait-list trial in palliative care (ELSA)

Walshe C, Dodd S, Hill M, et al. How effective are volunteers at supporting people in their last year of life? A pragmatic randomised wait-list trial in palliative care (ELSA). BMC Medicine. 2016;14(1):203. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-016-0746-8.

Background
Clinical care alone at the end of life is unlikely to meet all needs. Volunteers are a key resource, acceptable to patients, but there is no evidence on care outcomes. This study aimed to determine whether support from a social action volunteer service is better than usual care at improving quality of life for adults in the last year of life.

Methods
A pragmatic, multi-centre wait-list controlled trial, with participants randomly allocated to receive the volunteer support intervention either immediately or after a 4 week wait. Trained volunteers provided tailored face-to-face support including befriending, practical support and signposting to services, primarily provided within the home, typically for 2–3 hours per week. The primary outcome was rate of change of quality of life at 4 weeks (WHO QOL BREF, a general, culturally sensitive measure). Secondary outcomes included rate of change of quality of life at 8 weeks and Loneliness (De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale), social support (mMOS-SS), and reported use of health and social care services at 4 and 8 weeks.

Results
In total, 196 adults (61% (n = 109) female; mean age 72 years) were included in the study. No significant difference was found in main or secondary outcomes at 4 weeks. Rate of change of quality of life showed trends in favour of the intervention (physical quality of life domain: b = 3.98, CI, –0.38 to 8.34; psychological domain: b = 2.59, CI, –2.24 to 7.43; environmental domain: b = 3, CI, –4.13 to 4.91). Adjusted analyses to control for hours of volunteer input found significantly less decrease in physical quality of life in the intervention group (slope (b) 4.43, CI, 0.10 to 8.76). While the intervention also favoured the rate of change of emotional (b = –0.08; CI, –0.52 to 0.35) and social loneliness (b = –0.20; CI, –0.58 to 0.18), social support (b = 0.13; CI, –0.13 to 0.39), and reported use of health and social care professionals (b = 0.16; CI, –0.22 to 0.55), these were not statistically significant. No adverse events were reported.

Conclusions
Clinicians can confidently refer to volunteer services at the end of life. Future research should focus on ‘dose’ to maximise likely impact.

Posted in Front Page, Geriatrics, Hot Topics in Research

Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI)

The PCOM Library is offering a new resource, the Journal of Medical Insight.

JoMI is a surgical video journal / virtual operating theater that seeks to impact health care and education through filming and publishing surgical procedures performed by top teaching physicians.

JoMI was filmed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and other top institutions and, at present, primarily focuses on orthopedics, orthopedic trauma, and general surgery and patient care.

Access from the web, tablet, laptop and smartphones. You need only to create an account on JoMI.com and list Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine as the “Institution”. This will allow for complete access (including off-campus and on tablets, laptops, and smartphones).

Posted in Front Page, Library News, New Resources

Hot Topics: Peer-Reviewed Blog Introduces New Medical Researchers to Publishing

Coached Peer Review: Developing the Next Generation of Authors

Sidalak D, Purdy E, Luckett-Gatopoulos S, Murray H, Thoma B, Chan TM. Coached peer review: Developing the next generation of authors. Academic Medicine. 2017;92(2):201-204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001224.

Problem
Publishing in academic journals is challenging for learners. Those who pass the initial stages of internal review by an editor often find the anonymous peer review process harsh. Academic blogs offer alternate avenues for publishing medical education material. Many blogs, however, lack a peer review process, which some consumers argue compromises the quality of materials published.

Approach
CanadiEM (formerly BoringEM) is an academic educational emergency medicine blog dedicated to publishing high-quality materials produced by learners (i.e., residents and medical students). The editorial team has designed and implemented a collaborative “coached peer review” process that comprises an open exchange among the learner–author, editors, and reviewers. The goal of this process is to facilitate the publication of high-quality academic materials by learner–authors while providing focused feedback to help them develop academic writing skills.

Outcomes
The authors of this Innovation Report surveyed (February–June 2015) their blog’s learner–authors and external expert “staff” reviewers who had participated in coached peer review for their reactions to the process. The survey results revealed that participants viewed the process positively compared with both traditional journal peer review and academic blog publication processes. Participants found the process friendly, easy, efficient, and transparent. Learner–authors also reported increased confidence in their published material. These outcomes met the goals of coached peer review.

Next Steps
CanadiEM aims to inspire continued participation in, exposure to, and high quality production of academic writing by promoting the adoption of coached peer review for online educational resources produced by learners.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Research Commentary, Uncategorized

Hot Topics: Larger Racial Disparity in Cervical Cancer Gap Than Previously Estimated

Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States

Beavis AL, Gravitt PE, Rositch AF. Hysterectomy-corrected cervical cancer mortality rates reveal a larger racial disparity in the United States. Cancer. 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30507.

BACKGROUND
The objectives of this study were to determine the age-standardized and age-specific annual US cervical cancer mortality rates after correction for the prevalence of hysterectomy and to evaluate disparities by age and race.

METHODS
Estimates for deaths due to cervical cancer stratified by age, state, year, and race were derived from the National Center for Health Statistics county mortality data (2000-2012). Equivalently stratified data on the prevalence of hysterectomy for women 20 years old or older from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey were used to remove women who were not at risk from the denominator. Age-specific and age-standardized mortality rates were computed, and trends in mortality rates were analyzed with Joinpoint regression.

RESULTS
Age-standardized rates were higher for both races after correction. For black women, the corrected mortality rate was 10.1 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-10.6), whereas the uncorrected rate was 5.7 per 100,000 (95% CI, 5.5-6.0). The corrected rate for white women was 4.7 per 100,000 (95% CI, 4.6-4.8), whereas the uncorrected rate was 3.2 per 100,000 (95% CI, 3.1-3.2). Without the correction, the disparity in mortality between races was underestimated by 44%. Black women who were 85 years old or older had the highest corrected rate: 37.2 deaths per 100,000. A trend analysis of corrected rates demonstrated that white women’s rates decreased at 0.8% per year, whereas the annual decrease for black women was 3.6% (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS
A correction for hysterectomy has revealed that cervical cancer mortality rates are underestimated, particularly in black women. The highest rates are seen in the oldest black women, and public health efforts should focus on appropriate screening and adequate treatment in this population. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Library Satisfaction Survey (LibQual+®)

The library satisfaction survey is now closed.  Thanks to all who participated!

Winners will be announced soon.

Results will be posted on the library website as soon as the results are analyzed.

If you have any questions please visit our LibQual+® Guide or contact the library assessment team.

Posted in Front Page, Library News

Hot Topics: New Free Database Crowdsources Cancer Mutation Research

CIViC is a Community Knowledgebase for Expert Crowdsourcing the Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer

Griffith M, Spies NC, Krysiak K, et al. CIViC is a community knowledgebase for expert crowdsourcing the clinical interpretation of variants in cancer. Nat Genet. 2017;49(2):170-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3774.

CIViC is an expert-crowdsourced knowledgebase for Clinical Interpretation of Variants in Cancer describing the therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic and predisposing relevance of inherited and somatic variants of all types. CIViC is committed to open-source code, open-access content, public application programming interfaces (APIs) and provenance of supporting evidence to allow for the transparent creation of current and accurate variant interpretations for use in cancer precision medicine.

Posted in Front Page, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI) trial

The PCOM Library is offering a one month trial to the Journal of Medical Insight.

JoMI is a surgical video journal / virtual operating theater that seeks to impact health care and education through filming and publishing surgical procedures performed by top teaching physicians.

JoMI was filmed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and other top institutions and, at present, primarily focuses on orthopedics, orthopedic trauma, and general surgery and patient care.

Access from the web, tablet, laptop and smartphones. You need only to create an account on JoMI.com and list Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine as the “Institution”. This will allow for complete access (including off-campus and on tablets, laptops, and smartphones).

The institutional trial starts 02/01/17 and expires on 3/01/17.

Did you find this resource useful? Please send comments to library@pcom.edu.

Posted in Front Page, Library News, New Resources

Hot Topics: Women in Poverty More at Risk for Heart Attacks Than Men

Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Backholer K, Peters SAE, Bots SH, Peeters A, Huxley RR, Woodward M. Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2016-207890.

Background Low socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but whether its effects are comparable in women and men is unknown.

Methods PubMed MEDLINE was systematically searched. Studies that reported sex-specific estimates, and associated variability, of the relative risk (RR) for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke or CVD according to a marker of SES (education, occupation, income or area of residence), for women and men were included. RRs were combined with those derived from cohort studies using individual participant data. Data were pooled using random effects meta-analyses with inverse variance weighting. Estimates of the ratio of the RRs (RRR), comparing women with men, were computed.

Results Data from 116 cohorts, over 22 million individuals, and over 1 million CVD events, suggest that lower SES is associated with increased risk of CHD, stroke and CVD in women and men. For CHD, there was a significantly greater excess risk associated with lower educational attainment in women compared with men; comparing lowest with highest levels, the age-adjusted RRR was 1.24 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.41) and the multiple-adjusted RRR was 1.34 (1.09 to 1.63). For stroke, the age-adjusted RRR was 0.93 (0.72 to 1.18), and the multiple-adjusted was RRR 0.79 (0.53 to 1.19). Corresponding results for CVD were 1.18 (1.03 to 1.36), 1.23 (1.03 to 1.48), respectively. Similar results were observed for other markers of SES for all three outcomes.

Conclusions Reduction of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD and CVD outcomes might require different approaches for men and women.

Posted in Cardiology, Front Page, Hot Topics in Research