Month: August 2016

Scheduled Refworks Downtime – August 20, 2016

On Saturday, August 20, 2016, ProQuest will be upgrading its systems infrastructure. ProQuest platforms (including Refworks and Digital Dissertations) will be unavailable beginning at at 10:00 PM Eastern Standard Time and will last for 8 hours.

Posted in Service Disruptions

APA Style CENTRAL®

The PCOM Library is pleased to provide access to the new APA Style CENTRAL®!

Thanks to all who provided feedback.

The advantages include:

1. Digital library of APA Style quick guides and tutorials to refine your writing, and searches the APA Manual of Style by topic area.
2. Plan sound research with the research tools, and build a reference library with customized APA Style reference templates.
3. Translate your research into concise, powerful articles that are formatted for style.
4. Browse and search features to identify the best journals for publication.
5. Plagiarism tutorials.

Did you find this resource useful? Please send comments to library@pcom.edu.

Posted in Front Page, Library News, New Resources

Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial

Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial

In the phase 3 Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials–Newly Diagnosed Patients (ENESTnd) study, nilotinib resulted in earlier and higher response rates and a lower risk of progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, patients’ long-term outcomes in ENESTnd are evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. By 5 years, more than half of all patients in each nilotinib arm (300 mg twice daily, 54%; 400 mg twice daily, 52%) achieved a molecular response 4.5 (MR4.5; BCR-ABL ⩽0.0032% on the International Scale) compared with 31% of patients in the imatinib arm. A benefit of nilotinib was observed across all Sokal risk groups. Overall, safety results remained consistent with those from previous reports. Numerically more cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurred in patients receiving nilotinib vs imatinib, and elevations in blood cholesterol and glucose levels were also more frequent with nilotinib. In contrast to the high mortality rate associated with CML progression, few deaths in any arm were associated with CVEs, infections or pulmonary diseases. These long-term results support the positive benefit-risk profile of frontline nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in patients with CML-CP.

A Hochhaus, G Saglio, TP Hughes, RA Larson, D-W Kim, S Issaragrisil, PD le Coutre, G Etienne , PE Dorlhiac-Llacer, RE Clark, IW Flinn, H Nakamae, B Donohue, W Deng, D Dalal, HD Menssen and HM Kantarjian

Leukemia (2016) 30, 1044–1054; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.5

Posted in August, Blood, Hot Topics in Research, Oncology

An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement—Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals

An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement—Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals
A Call for Action

Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, includingincreased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relativelyunrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients.

Marc Moss, MD; Vicki S. Good, RN, MSN, CENP, CPPS; David Gozal, MD, MBA; Ruth Kleinpell, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCCM; and Curtis N. Sessler, MD, FCCP, FCCM

CHEST 2016; 150(1):17-26

 

 

Posted in August, Hot Topics in Research, Research Commentary